Jyanni Steffensen Her feet covered many cocoons...
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Tragic Shyness

Orlando Jones went to the hospital with Li Zhuo and her mother. It was the teaching hospital of Jinzhou Medical University. The director examined her. She had the usual battery of tests - her ECG was 'normal', her blood pressure was 'normal', her liver was 'normal', her X-ray was 'normal' (Orlando Jones knew this routine having been through it all before). Her white blood cell count was perhaps a little elevated. There was never anything physically wrong with her. It was emotional or mental. The doctor concluded that it was a nervous disorder (not mental) and prescribed a mixture of a Chinese tonic - Bliss Well - and some Danish anti-depressants. Orlando Jones thought that she just suffered from a tragic shyness. She was unable (or ashamed) to communicate her fears (they seem so baseless) to anyone. D. (to whom she had spoken) thought that she was suffering from delayed cultural dislocation. She took a taxi back to the University and began pounding on the keyboard again. She re-heated the remnants of the chicken soup that she had made the day before.

That night Orlando Jones slept. In the morning, her symptoms had disappeared. They did not return.

I can imagine several solutions to the amorous crisis - idea of withdrawal, idea of travel. In spite of this Roland insists that the lover's discourse is, in a sense, a series of No Exits. All of the solutions he imagines are internal to the amorous system - withdrawal, travel, suicide. He says it is always the lover who sequesters herself, departs or dies.

Orlando Jones decided to apply for a position in Cyprus from September. L. says that North Cyptus is a "semi-prison".