Jyanni Steffensen Her feet covered many cocoons...
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Desire Does Die

Orlando Jones was surprised to hear Alexander Curosoe (Vincent Perez) in Fanfan suddenly expounding what he thought was the solution to preserving desire as perpetual. "LA solution", he called it. His solution to avoiding the "banality of coupledom" was: "I'll court Fanfan forever without ever letting her know that I love her. I'll never kiss her until the day I die... Why should I lay her?... I want my desire to remain perpetual. What's exciting is when desire remains unfulfilled." "Yes", thought Orlando Jones, "he has been reading Lacan." Roland Barthes, she knew for sure, had read Lacan. Little good it had done him. Besides, Orlando Jones had already tried this experiment. Admittedly, desire had persisted for twelve years instead of the usual six weeks to six months (or sometimes only overnight), but in the end, it had died also. She had, one day, simply desired someone else more - someone introduced to her by her object of desire. This suddenly struck Orlando Jones as hilarious. Of course, the character, Alexander, in Fanfan did not have nearly so much curiosity (or stamina) to discover just how long "perpetual" was likely to be. By the last scene it was obvious that, if Fanfan (Sophie Marceau) had her way with him, they would be fucking in seconds. Fortunately, perhaps, for Alexander's theory of desire, the film ended at this very moment. Orlando Jones was more interested in the fact that Alexander kept a pet alligator (a small one in a cage) in his Paris apartment. The alligator was called Your Lordship. He also had a duck, a rabbit and a goat. In the Peony Pavilion, a servant entered and announced to the opium smoking Grandfather that he had found the "white parrot" from the west that his master had so desired. He brought in a cockatoo in a cage. The cockatoo spoke. It spoke in Chinese.

Orlando Jones abandoned life for film. She forgot about Russell Crowe.

Finally, Le Fabileux Destin d'Amelie Poulain appeared in the electronics market. She hoped that it, at least, had English subtitles (had been pirated from an English speaking country). It did not, but she could understand enough of the French dialogue and narration anyway. The first disc of the set was defective, refused to play. She watched the second half of the film attempting to reconstruct the narrative sequences that might have preceded it. She found the film charming.

Freud borrowed fiction knowing (fearing) that there were supplementary resources to be found there, that fiction is required as a supplement to life.

Both objects and human desires undergo change. [6]